Blood test predicts kids at risk for dengue shock syndrome

The most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. More than a third of the world’s population lives in areas at risk for dengue virus infection, […]

  • Food insecurity can affect your mental health

    Food insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people’s health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine determined that FI was associated with poorer mental health […]

  • Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levels

    Columbia University researchers have developed a personalized algorithm that predicts the impact of particular foods on an individual’s blood sugar levels. The algorithm has been integrated into an app, Glucoracle, that will allow individuals with type 2 diabetes to keep a tighter rein on their glucose levels — the key to preventing or controlling the major complications of a disease […]

  • Ssafer alternative to lithium-ion batteries

    Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory’s (NRL) Chemistry Division have developed a safer alternative to fire-prone lithium-ion batteries, which were recently banned for some applications on Navy ships and other military platforms. Joseph Parker, Jeffrey Long, and Debra Rolison from NRL’s Advanced Electrochemical Materials group are leading an effort to create an entire family of safer, water-based, zinc batteries. […]

  • Tibetan people have multiple adaptations for life at high altitudes

    The Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans. Hao Hu and Chad Huff of the University of Texas, Houston, and colleagues report these findings in a new study published April 27th, 2017 in PLOS Genetics. The people of Tibet have […]

  • Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region’s past

    Ice cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe’s winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period. The cores provide insights into how the region’s climate has changed over time. The researchers’ results, published this week in the journal Scientific Reports, could help reveal […]

  • Artificial Intelligence Shows Potential to Fight Blindness

    Researchers from the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. This advance has the potential to reduce the worldwide rate of vision loss due to diabetes. In a study published online in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the researchers […]

  • For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap together

    Like two magnets being pulled toward each other, tiny crystals twist, align and slam into each other, but due to an altogether different force. For the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws them together and visualized how they swivel and align. Called van der Waals forces, the attraction provides insights into how crystals self-assemble, an activity that […]

  • How plants form their sugar transport routes

    In experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers from Heidelberg University were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. According to Prof. Dr Thomas Greb of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), these factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells. The findings of the […]

  • Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the body

    The collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research published in PLOS Computational Biology suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes. Every human is home to a collection of thousands of diverse species of microbes known as the […]